domingo, 25 de agosto de 2019

In TOUCH with Antiquity: Painting Greek Vases with kids at the Getty Villa (LA)







Focusing again on family programs, as I did years ago in NYC and Boston Museums, I was able to enjoy a great time with my daughter, husband and relatives in the Getty Villa Education room.






Greek vases told stories from myth, daily life, and even ancient theater. I especially liked the shadows activity where you could recreate scenes from the vases by becoming real-life black figures as you played with tools behind the screen. We had fun with our families’ three girls.














Parents and children enjoyed themselves and played while being in touch with Antiquity. 

In this area designed for families, we found a multisensory place for exploring the Greek black and red-figure vases. 

One of the activities consisted of touching and painting with black markers on scaled greek vases reproductions. It was so nice to draw on big, 3D objects.  

You could find other areas to identify vase shapes and the different painting techniques employed by artists of that time.

















More information about the Getty Villa:
J. Paul Getty and His Villa
J. Paul Getty purchased his first work of ancient art in 1939: a small terracotta sculpture. His antiquities collection grew to include Greek, Roman, and Etruscan art, and in 1968 he announced he would build a major museum on his Malibu property. It would be a near replica of the Villa dei Papiri, a luxurious Roman residence in Herculaneum, Italy that had been buried by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 A.D.

Re-imagining the Villa dei Papiri
The Villa dei Papiri (“Villa of the Papyruses”) was rediscovered in the 1750s. The excavation recovered bronze and marble sculptures, wall paintings, colorful stone pavements, and over a thousand papyrus scrolls—hence the name.


When planning for the construction of the Getty Villa in the 1970s, architects looked closely at the partial excavation of the Villa dei Papiri and at other ancient Roman houses in Pompeii, Herculaneum, and Stabiae to influence the design. The scale, appearance, and some of the materials of the Getty Villa are taken from the Villa dei Papiri, as is the floor plan, though it is a mirror of the original.

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